New funding to help fortify New South Wales fire trails

26 October 2018

Fire trails and access points are being improved to support firefighters on the frontline, thanks to almost $3.4 million in joint Commonwealth and New South Wales Government funding.

Funding is being provided through the Bush Fire Grants Scheme under the jointly funded Commonwealth-State National Partnership Agreement (NPA) on Natural Disaster Resilience.

Assistant Minister for Home Affairs Senator Linda Reynolds, who has responsibility for Commonwealth disaster assistance, said the funding will be used to improve fire trails and access areas in the Hunter, Yass, and Snowy Valleys regions.

“NSW communities face serious bush fire risk and this funding will assist the NSW Rural Fire Service (RFS) in improving their bush fire response practices,” Assistant Minister Reynolds said.

“In recent months we have seen devastating bush fires across NSW that required significant firefighting efforts to bring them under control.

“This is exactly why our Commonwealth and New South Wales Governments are continuing to work together to strengthen capabilities in the community.”

NSW Minister for Emergency Services Troy Grant said the $3.38 million funding for the NSW RFS would help the agency manage projects to tackle bush fire risks.

“Bush fires can have an incredibly devastating impact on communities right across NSW, and that’s why it’s so important for us to understand and manage bush fire risks,” Minister Grant said.

“The RFS are at the forefront of that bush fire response, and we’re very fortunate to have some of the most highly-trained and experienced firefighters in the world to keep us safe.

“With the constant threat of fires each bush fire season, it is absolutely vital that our RFS volunteers are properly supported so they can continue their important work in and for the community.”

NSW RFS Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons said bush fire preparations are a cooperative effort between emergency services, land agencies, state and local governments and the community.

“Local brigades, government agencies and land managers undertake as much hazard reduction as possible, and it is never too late for residents to start preparing their property, make or update their bush fire survival plan, and question how fireproof it is,” Commissioner Fitzsimmons said.