Timeline of Emergency Impacts

Considerations ​​for your clients

1-3 days

  • Your clients may be displaced from their home. They may be at home, but have no power or water, leaving them unable to cook or heat their homes
  • They may be unable to make or receive phone calls or use teletype equipment, which could stop them from contacting their friends, family and other support networks
  • Oxygen and dialysis equipment may not work
  • Even if they're not in the area, your clients can still be affected by a disaster due to media coverage or past trauma
  • They may be separated from friends and family
  • Community buses, public transport or accessible vehicles may be hard to access.

1-3 weeks

  • Your clients may be stressed and financially strained as they buy replacement belongings
  • They may have lost important documents or sentimental items
  • They may be displaced until they can return home
  • They may not be able to contact pharmacies, doctors or support services if communications are affected.

1-6 months​​

  • Your clients may be temporarily moved while their homes are repaired or rebuilt
  • They may plan to move permanently, which can physically separate them from support networks or affect their ability to access services.

6-12 mon​​ths

  • Your clients may be moving back into homes that have been repaired or rebuilt
  • Just because someone has moved back into their home does not mean that they have recovered from the emergency. Moving may be the event that reminds them of what they have lost, or triggers a mix of emotions about what happened to them and their communities.

1​​2+ months

  • The first anniversary of any major emergency is significant. It can be a time of reflection on how life has changed. It can also highlight a need for more support, like counselling
  • Your clients may only now begin to feel the full effect of the emergency. By this time, and formal support services that were set up to help people, like case management or counselling, may no longer be available.